Category Archives: hardware

like kudzu

In this dismal, drifting season, when the weather is a horror and our politics are unmoored and far from shore, you look for signs of life, signs that things go on.

Here’s one, a good one, from the always valuable diymedia.net blog written by John Anderson: notes on the spread of pirate radio in New York City.  There are more than a hundred pirate stations on the air there – that’s the estimate of the official, sanctioned broadcasters, to whom pirates are just roaches, potential interference in their signals and more important, their business models.

But for the communities they serve, the pirates are the neighborhood voice, and Anderson ties pirate radio specifically to the Haitian diaspora in Brooklyn. And then he goes further, with a really interesting notion – using low power, tiny computers like Raspberry Pis to extend the reach and availability of the hole-in-the-wall pirates, who broadcast irregularly, go on and off the air, move on. It’s a fascinating, worthy idea.

Anderson has written eloquently for a long time about community radio, and the powerful forces – including, alas, public radio – allied against it. Reading him tonight reminded me of another piece I saw recently on Radio Survivor about legal 1 watt broadcasters in New Zealand. Just enough to reach the neighborhood, but that’s where community starts, so I suppose that’s the point.  There are safeguards so no one can game the system with tricky antenna designs or other hacks to make the signal stronger than it should be, and best of all, you don’t need a license. In my fantasy life, the Republican-majority FCC thinks this is a great idea – what could be more American than not having to ask permission – and opens the floodgates on micro radio experimentation. I won’t count on it.

(The authorities, of course, are always “cracking down” on pirate radio; pirate radio is always popping back up, shortly after the last cop, in this case the FCC, pulls away.)

the best buy vig

I tried to return a wireless router to my local Best Buy today, failed, and in the process learned something about the state of big box commerce.

The lesson will probably cost me $100.

Over the course of a year, I always end up needing a few hundred dollars’ worth of tech stuff; hard drives and memory, cases and routers. And even though I’m a heavy user of Amazon, I’ve tried to buy most of the aforementioned stuff at Best Buy.

Not because I particularly like the place, mind you; it’s overpriced and if I really want selection, Amazon is fine. So is eBay or a few specialty web sites. Best Buy is the Barnes & Noble of tech, the kind of place people who don’t know much about technology go to, thinking they’re going to get a decent selection and knowledgeable help. Generally, neither condition is true.

But it does provide jobs, and if you’re a kid who wants to be around tech, it beats working at your local fast food joint. And it’s kind of convenient, though the convenience of being able to buy something now is usually offset by the fact that you can’t quite buy the item you really want.

Anyway, routers.

In my experience, routers are generally good for a year or two before they go flaky, stop being reliable for reasons that are never quite obvious, and after I screw around with the settings for a week or two it always comes down to buying a new one, which works either a little better or a little worse than what it replaced, and life goes on.

I dropped a hundred dollars back in May on an Asus router that looked decent – I read the reviews on Amazon and in general people liked it, though there were some early bugs with the firmware. It appeared to be a step up from the $70 Netgears I had been buying, without walking over to the land of $250-$350 routers  with more stuff than I could possibly want, or use. Were I living alone, I’d probably buy something that runs one of the open source router platforms and waste some nights screwing around, but my wife and son both want reliable internet now, so I needed something I can set and forget.

The Asus was that, plus a little geekiness – a pretty good web interface I could play with. And from May to early October, it ran fine. But maybe three weeks ago, after we lost power in a thunderstorm, the router started misbehaving. Of course I did all the obvious; made sure the cable modem was ok, checked the wires, restarted (many times) the router, did a few other things. But the router just lost some of its reach no matter what I did; the wifi signal now got as far as our kitchen counter, but not the family room sitting area, where my wife and I spend the majority of our time.

I bought a $20 range extender, which worked reasonably well – but my wife’s Macbook Air choked on it.

So today I packed up the router and went back to Best Buy, six months, more or less, after purchase, with original box and parts and receipt.

No sale. The kid behind the counter told me that since I was past the 15 day return period, I would have to deal with the manufacturer. I asked to speak to the manager, who explained in slightly more detail that their agreement with Asus means that they wouldn’t get anything back on the router if they took it, and while she understood how I felt, there really wasn’t anything she could do.

And she was sure Asus would be helpful. Obviously, she’s never dealt with Asus.

But here’s the thing that got to me: both the first person I spoke with and the manager made a big point of saying, in not so many words, “We have a contract/relationship with Asus. We have to live by the terms of our agreement. That’s why we can’t help you.”

Except…the manager told me that if I had purchased Best Buy’s protection plan when I got the router, we wouldn’t be having the conversation. They’d just take the thing back, no questions asked.  So much for contracts and relationships between supplier (Asus) and store.

(I typically don’t buy protection plans because they tend to cover events after the first year, and generally if tech is going to fail, it will fail early. I’m careful with what I own, so breakage isn’t an issue. And the extra $10 or $15 makes the purchase from a Best Buy even less competitive with Amazon.)

So now I ask myself, why bother with Best Buy at all? I’m just old enough to remember when you bought something from your local appliance shop, they would almost always make it right if it broke. And I’ve been around enough mom and pop computer stores from the late 80s and early 90s to see the lengths people will go to, to help their customers solve a problem. It was part of the unwritten contract between people like me and local businesses; I’ll give you my dollars, you don’t screw me on support.

Best Buy has neatly turned the equation on its head: you want to buy something locally, expect to pay more for it – and oh yeah, you want service with that? Sure, but it’ll cost ya.

Anyway, I vowed to the manager to not set foot in a Best Buy again, a promise I intend to keep. And the next time one of the big box stores complains about how the Amazons of the world are eating their lunch, the only thing I’m gonna think is: good. Serves you right.